Children

Highs And Lows Of A High-Risk Pregnancy

At about 10 weeks pregnant, I had a meltdown after one of my MANY doctor’s appointments that week. When I got pregnant, I had zero idea what being a high-risk meant. Now that I’ve been doing this pregnancy thing for 17 weeks, I’ve gotten the hang of it BUT it was VERY overwhelming during the first trimester.

What Makes Me A High-Risk
Having been born with a two heart defects, one that was corrected at birth and one that is NOT corrected puts me at high-risk along with being born with hydrocephalus.

Differences between a High-Risk Pregnancy and a normal pregnancy
Normal pregnancies you start by seeing a OBGYN once a month, then it increases in frequency as your pregnancy progresses. High-risk pregnancies means you’re followed by more than one doctor depending on what your medical need is. Normal pregnancies you take a prenatal vitamin and they call it good. High-risk pregnancies means you may be on a TON of medication. Normal pregnancies you may have 2 to 3 ultrasounds your entire 40 week pregnancy, high risk pregnancies generally mean MORE ultrasounds and MORE invasive tests.

Highlights of Being a High-Risk Pregnancy
– Being a first-time mom means I have a ton of questions, luckily I have a TON of doctors to turn to answer my questions.
– More ultrasounds. For my peace of mind, this is wonderful.
– Seeing more doctors. This is also a lowlight but I do LOVE being able to have more peace of mind that Baby Murray is growing and that my body is doing well.

Lowlights of Being a High-Risk Pregnancy
– MORE doctors appointments. I’m currently being seen by a high-risk OBGYN(who will deliver Baby Murray), a Maternal Fetal Medicine specialist(who will attend the birth as well!), a geneticists, a maternal cardiologist, an internist and a neurologist. Ya, try to keep that straight every month.
– MORE risk to baby and me. That is an obvious one.
– MORE medications. Pretty sure most women take just a prenatal and call it a day. I currently take baby aspirin 80mg once a day, Jamieson Prenatal once a day, Labetalol(blood pressure medication) 100mg twice a day, Folic Acid 5mg once a day, AND Jamieson Calcium/Magnesium once a day. If you’re wondering, YES I do have a pill-box now to keep everything straight.
– Bigger possibility of a premature birth or bedrest.

There seems to be WAY more lowlights to highlights during this pregnancy but honestly, I’m just trying to stay positive because I realize that not everyone gets to experience what I’m experiencing. I’m so over-the-moon to be pregnant, to be this far pregnant and to be healthy that I thank my lucky stars that I’m pregnant BUT it is overwhelming at times, thankfully I do have The Mister to help me navigate not only the physical and geographical side of finding and making my doctors appointments BUT also the emotional side of being a high-risk.

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6 thoughts on “Highs And Lows Of A High-Risk Pregnancy

  1. I’m just so happy for you guys and can’t wait to see your little one in a few months! I’m sorry about all the stress that goes along with being high risk though. It sounds like you and the little one are in good hands though and all will be well.

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  2. What a challenge! You’ve got this, though!
    My bff has Type 1 diabetes and her first pregnancy was high risk. The second one was, too, but she was a pro by that point. You and baby Murray will be great!

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    1. That gives me the confidence to have a second! Haha, I was pretty certain for a few weeks there that this would be my last! I’m starting to get used to the rhythm of appointments so it’s getting easier which is making my anxiety a lot easier to handle.

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  3. I am in a similar-but-opposite stage of life right now, so I commiserate with your frustration. My health problems mean it’s not safe for me to get pregnant because if I did right now, I’d be at an increased risk for miscarriage, preterm labor, low birth weight, and birth defects. Also death. (Not that I’d be at a high risk for dying, but I’m currently at a constant risk for an obstructed bowel, which is one of the few causes of death for people with Crohn’s during pregnancy).

    So all the medical appointments and health problems are slowly metaphorically killing me right now. I’m just tired of being sick, I’m tired of being tired, and I’m tired of NOT being pregnant. My biological clock went off years ago, and it’s so freaking hard having to ignore it for now.

    Basically, I get being grateful for attentive healthcare and a good medical team while also being frustrated at the necessity.

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